Sustainability & Impact

Welcome judges!

The Accelerator for Enterprising Women team is thrilled to have you judge the Sustainability and Impact category for our Kickstarter Challenge. 

All submitted business ideas are detailed below and have been prepared by young women aged 18-24 from all over Australia. Your task as judge is to review all submissions and score each business idea in the corresponding judging form. 

Some entries contain collateral such as videos or posters. Please be sure to click on the buttons to access these.

Submitted Business Ideas:

Knoggin Lessons Learned

Jemima Yarnold

“If I won the seed capital funding, I would spend it on developing a minimum viable product to trial the software with initial users and gain early adopting customers to further the development of the program.”

Description:

Knoggin is a software platform that allows users to easily upload, share and learn from construction project lessons. The system provides a database of lessons that users can search to find answers to their pressing issues. Knoggin is simple and quick to use, acknowledging the time constraints of construction professionals while still providing the benefit of knowledge sharing. Push notifications are used to share lessons between teams and organisations. A curated construction database pulls generic lessons from each user to provide everyone with the same ability to tap into experience. This reduces the asymmetry of experience among users, particularly those who have not been given the opportunity to learn on the job.

Problem:

There is a lack of learning in the construction industry. Lessons from one team are not transferred to the next, who then make the same mistake. For example, a new project manager might schedule in the standard 28 days to allow a concrete slab to cure. They find out later that the climate zone requires 30 days, and the concrete needs to be removed and started from scratch. This process is frustrating and costs time, money, and effort to rectify. Project managers and builders are time poor so do not frequently upload lessons to complicated systems (if a process is even available).

Customers:

Knoggin’s target market is the Australian construction industry, approximately 1.2m people. In particular, those companies who are repeating mistakes and don’t know why. They are not leveraging previous experience. They have high employee turnover and cannot effectively use people’s experience in the field – so revert to poor knowledge sharing practices or failing.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

If I won the seed capital funding, I would spend it on developing a minimum viable product to trial the software with initial users and gain early adopting customers to further the development of the program.

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Whizzed!

Alexandra Kerr

“I would build an MVP prototype accessible for students to try. I would work with one university to put up (probably first year law subjects) a few textbooks for just one subject. I would work with this class closely to develop UX design and features they may want. Then look to seek investment to expand into other subjects/acquire more textbooks.”

Description:

I want to help university students thrive in their studies by creating a platform where students can access their textbooks for a monthly subscription rate. This E-textbook library aims to create a more equal opportunity to educational resources for students of all socioeconomic backgrounds whilst also creating a more sustainable way for textbook usage to grow. Only targeting university students, we want to dissolve that archaic problem every student faces when they enter the university gates for the first time – the realisation that they are going to have a tough four years of affording textbooks. We want to help students not only access their prescribed textbooks but – read ahead, learn something new, access extra practice questions and more! This initiative also has a huge impact on environmental sustainability – acting as a catalyst to move resources online.

Problem:

University students cannot afford their textbooks. It is an archaic problem that is starting to spiral out of control. As students cannot afford their textbooks, they are turning to the second-hand market and illegally downloading some old version of their prescribed text. In turn, publishers are facing declining sales and piracy issues. Our platform aims to bring this market back to equilibrium by revamping demand for textbook resources and helping publishers maintain revenue streams.

Customers:

University students! Particularly, undergraduate degree, textbook heavy subjects such as law students, finance and other commerce subjects. Of course, hoping to expand into all subject areas.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

I would build an MVP prototype accessible for students to try. I would work with one university to put up (probably first year law subjects) a few textbooks for just one subject. I would work with this class closely to develop UX design and features they may want. Then look to seek investment to expand into other subjects/acquire more textbooks.

Additional information:

University students should not have to forego their prescribed texts just because they cannot afford them and publishers should not have to face declining sales and piracy for the amount of incredible work and research that goes into the creation of a textbook. I would love to work alongside both universities and publishers to keep everyone happy to get this platform out. This is not about the money for me, but for helping every player in this market achieve their ideal outcome – because it is so important that in such a dynamic intellectual climate we are so lucky to have in Australia, everyone gets to experience it!

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Nana Pad

Mursal Azadzoi

“In the island of Kiribati, coping with menstruation hygienically and with dignity in a school setting can be challenging for girls. With multiple barriers intersecting, girls are left disempowered.”

Description:

In the island of Kiribati, coping with menstruation hygienically and with dignity in a school setting can be challenging for girls. With multiple barriers intersecting (e.g. lack of clean water, limited school bathrooms, harmful menstrual practices and overall low access to sanitary products), girls are left disempowered. Poor menstrual hygiene management can result in a normal biological process becoming an obstacle to improved education, health and gender equality. To meet this challenge, we have designed the novel Nana pad. The Nana Pad consists of a peel that is a reusable cotton outer shell with elastic ruching to hold place the inner portion of the pad. These shells are modelled after traditional blouses called tibuta and can be washed after each cycle and re-used for up to 5 years. This peel is used to hold together a cake of highly absorbent disposable inserts made from actual banana fibre. The cake is structurally tucked in with a protective waste paper and banana fibre topper, used to keep the inserts secure. Due to the lack of water in school bathrooms, it is highly important that we ensure students are able to maintain hygiene and change their pads without the use of water. And given that it is common practice for women to bury their used menstrual cloths, our removable inserts and topper are made to degrade in soil conditions within 6 months. The whole pad is then packaged in local antimicrobial pandanus leaves keep the product sanitised during handling and transport. We have used the following considerations that are specific to Kiribati to inspire our design features and production:

– Environmentally friendly disposable inserts that minimises odour. School girls have reported that they’re traditionally mocked by fellow students if period odour was made obvious.

– Banana fibre inserts that are laced with bio-enzymes which will provide extra nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium for soil once buried.

– Due to its easy to use ruching mechanism, it is great for girls with disabilities. Girls with physical disabilities reportedly needed assistance from teachers to change their sanitary items, while girls with visual impairments found disposal of sanitary items difficult.

–  The production process requires minimal importing of materials and machinery as it relies on local resources (e.g. pandanus leaves, banana fibre, scrap metal and waste paper) and local talent (Kiribati women are very good sewers and the Kiribati Institute of Technology can be used to construct the initial production line). Because this is an innovative product, it will rely on a Community Focused Education Program in order to guarantee it’s fit within Kiribati society. This program can be developed in in partnership with Days for girls to reduce stigma and negative perception of menstruation. This includes a course for girls at Moroni High School (one of the highest funded high schools in south tarawa) on how to track their period, maintain hygienic practises and feel empowered. We believe that the Nana pad, paired with a circular business model and inclusive education, is a key step towards Kiribati becoming a more sanitary and equitable society.

Problem:

According to the ‘Kiribati Population and Housing Census’ there are 9849 girls between the ages of 11-19. That’s nearly 10% of the entire population! Each month, this 10% will miss out on a portion of their schooling due to poor menstrual hygiene practices. For girls on the island, their first period is celebrated as part of a unique celebration called Katekateka. But from then on, periods present a monthly challenge due to:

– Pre-existing taboo beliefs that menstruation is a form of sickness which leads to behavioural restrictions surrounding their independence.

– A lack of safe disposal methods for used pads and cloth at school. – A lack of washing facilities and separate bathrooms at school.

– Many of these women rely on wadding of cloth called Te Buru like a hotdog bun to soak up their menstrual blood.

– Very few of these women use commercial pads and for those that do, these pads are an expensive and increasing cost imported from outside Kiribati.

– A lack of accurate information and fear about periods. These challenges prevent girls from pursuing education beyond junior secondary school.

Customers:

Launch location:
Main island of South Tarawa. Starting with the private Moroni High School.

Target Market:
Female population of Kiribati (60,702 persons).

How they would spend seed capital funding:

1. Product Innovation – $35,000 R&D: The funding would initially help us in engaging with the local community to gather feedback on product-market fit. It will also allow us to conduct schools-based research for the learning materials in our education program. Product Introduction: After those vital steps, majority of the funding will be used to develop a prototype and machinery/equipment needed for production. This includes testing of production equipment, development of educational resources, promotional materials and create small production facilities on Kiribati.

2. Team Building – $20,000 New Hiring: We hope to offer paid employment and training for Kiribati Institute of Technology students, local tibuta makers and teachers.

3. Growth – $ 5,000 Customer Validation: With a focus on creating a system that allows us to track and gather insights from the program and see if we can minimise absenteeism.

The success of our project will be measured by:

– The number of children who attend our school-based program

– The number of our pads that are used by the girls

– A decrease in student absenteeism among girls

– An increase in the number of girls continuing past compulsory junior secondary schooling

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Balcony Backyard

Jamieson Lowe

“Hello! I am Jamieson Lowe and I am studying at Melbourne University, I studied Agricultural Science and major in plant and Soil Science. I am currently a part of the Wattle Fellowship at the University of Melbourne.”

Description:

Hello! I am Jamieson Lowe and I am studying at Melbourne University, I studied Agricultural Science and major in plant and Soil Science. I am currently a part of the Wattle Fellowship at the University of Melbourne which is a cohort of 20 selected students that are grounded in innovation and sustainability. My idea is to create a self-catering vegetable patch with a canopy cover made out of recycled timber pallets. This will fit on an apartment balcony and hopefully come in many designs and styles. From moving from my family farm in Albury Wodonga to Melbourne I have noticed how unconnected Melbourne citizens are the environment and nature. I want to create a sense of community supported by education about how to reconnect with nature from their own apartment balcony. Being self-watering and having a canopy cover, there would be very little maintenance required and I aim to provide easy tools and tricks about how to care for and look after your balcony backyard.

Problem:

Diverting from landfill through using recycled timber – Effective usage of a used space – education and connection to nature – watching your own food being grown

Customers:

People in Apartments – Really anybody with space for a veggie patch, the audience is really limitless

How they would spend seed capital funding:

Setting up a platform to sell the product – Buying materials to make the product

Additional information:

This project is currently underway with Wattle Fellowship at Melbourne University. I am happy to embrace all opportunities that come my way so I can reach a larger audience.

 

Rook

Tina Tran

“We would invest in tools and people that would help us grow and scale Rook. The capital would allow us to update our website and server hosting and add on development tools to run our software better. We would also be able to start investing in marketing tools to help us build a Rook community.”

Description:

The answer to reducing packaging waste is to avoid its use altogether. Rook is a digital packaging app that lets anyone scan a product to instantly view its packaging information without the need for unappealing QR codes. Brands can adopt minimalistic packaging, and still showcase their valuable product information that gives consumers the confidence that their product is sustainable. Current sustainable actions are all reactionary, alternative raw resources are highly expensive to substitute for packaging production. Alternatives to plastic-lined packaging such as cardboard or paper packaging still require finite raw materials as manufacturing inputs to packaging that ultimately ends up as waste in the same way that single-use packaging does. Sustainable alternatives are only set in place after the damage has been done, which is often too late. We are tackling the issue of mass-produced unnecessary packaging at the beginning of the product life cycle. Our commitment is to reduce the use of single-use packaging in the market through our digital packaging technology. By empowering committed sustainable brands to share more information about their products with less waste, we enable the growing conscious consumer market in Australia to turn to brands that genuinely won’t have a negative social or environmental impact.

Problem:

As a community, we need to place more pressure on brands to reduce their waste and undertake sustainable initiatives. Our commitment is to reduce the use of single-use packaging in the market through our digital packaging technology. By empowering committed sustainable brands to share more information about their products with less waste, we enable the growing conscious consumer market in Australia to turn to brands that genuinely won’t have a negative social or environmental impact.

Customers:

Our target customers are brands and business owners that value sustainability and building circular economy business practices. We partner with brands that want to reduce their packaging waste and stand out from the crowd by showcasing transparent product information and sustainable initiatives engagingly and sustainably.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

We would invest in tools and people that would help us grow and scale Rook. The capital would allow us to update our website and server hosting and add on development tools to run our software better. We would also be able to start investing in marketing tools to help us build a Rook community. The fund would also enable us to host showcase events, where we can set up retail spaces to test pilot our technology and bring together the eco-community here in Melbourne. We would love to create a space that showcases and educate the broader community of a circular economy shopping experience. Briding a new way to shop through innovation, tech, sustainability, and a love for the community.

Additional information:

We started working on our venture 8 months ago. In that time, we participated in the RMIT Activator accelerator program with Circular Economy Victoria, where we honed our idea and started to identify our product-market fit and future customers. During the program, we built an MVP to test with potential customers and users and found substantial support for our solution. Our team also became a finalist in the I-ACE circular economy hackathon, was one of the top 8 teams for the Rapid Open Innovation Sprint, and held a showcase at the Innovation Knowledge Week. Since the end of that program in early 2021, we have partnered with 2 clean beauty brands – Pits of Joy and Big Blue Cosmetica – who are keen to help us test our service using their products, customers, and retail spaces. We were also recently successful in receiving support from the City of Melbourne to help us envision Melbourne as a carbon-free city by 2030. With the value of the Kickstarter community, we can fast track our goal towards sustainable living and prosperity.

Pitch Deck

geoMATEry

Carmeli Gonzalez

“I would spend the money by getting the idea off the ground. I will use it to get the app and softwares up and running. It will very much help with campaigns that I would be running. The working app will show more and more charities how much it would boost their donations with minimal work on their side.”

Description:

An app where users receives reports and detailed information as to how the money that was donated are being used eg: buying eggs for feeding programs, buying cement or gravel to build schools. A detailed itemisation system that breaks it down for users. It also enables users to donate straight to the charity in a touch of a button globally. Another feature is an information board, where updates and information from Charities, NGO’s and other organisations are posted. Instead of the general public having to search for each organisation specifically and go through their website, all the information can be easy found in the app.

Problem:

It solves the huge mistrust of the public with charities as to where monetary donations go. The majority of people I surveyed stated that they do not donate because they don’t know where their money is going to. It creates a transparency on the side of Charities, NGO’s, and other groups that provides assistance to others. It would also raise money for these said organisations, as with an app like this, people in the survey stated that they are more likely to donate. In turn, more poeple around the globe would be able to recieve assistance and we can finally work towards making a world that is sustainable.

Customers:

The Target Market or users would be you, your neighbor, cousin, aunt, uncle, sister, brother, teacher, work mate, basically anyone who are willing to help.
How they would spend seed capital funding: I would spend the money by getting the idea off the ground. I will use it to get the app and softwares up and running. It will very much help with campaigns that I would be running. The working app will show more and more charities how much it would boost their donations with minimal work on their side.

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Wardrobe.

Zoe Tiffen

“The primary problem being solved is that of finding clothes that fit, quickly. Currently finding clothes that fit quickly is nearly impossible for women. Particularly because there is no standardization in women’s clothing sizes. “

Description:

The wardrobe is a two-sided marketplace, similar to Etsy. However, Wardrobe focuses on connecting consumers to clothing retailers based on the user’s physical size measurements and their detailed search criteria. Users input their detailed physical measurements, and then detailed search criteria, for example, input their waist, upper hip, hip, height and inseam measurements and search for: full-length black slim leg jeans. Wardrobe will then search through all the individual items from different retailers stored in its database to recommend individual items from different retailers and the recommended size to purchase to the customer. The MVP, Minimum Viable Product focuses on achieving the primary goals of enabling consumers to find pants that fit, quickly. However extensive plans for future functionality have already been determined, these will be rolled out in future version updates to the Wardrobe platform.

Problem:

The primary problem being solved is that of finding clothes that fit, quickly. Currently finding clothes that fit quickly is nearly impossible for women. Particularly because there is no standardization in women’s clothing sizes. A size 12 in one store could be closer to a size 8 in another store and a size 16 in a different store. It may even vary across different items in a store or across seasons. Online can be even more confusing as consumers are unable to try on clothes and have to rely on vague size guides and search through heaps of online stores just to find one item that might fit them. An additional problem Wardrobe aims to solve is for Small to medium businesses who currently struggle to get in front of their target market. This is particularly due to a lack of online presence. This is often due to the fact that larger brands like Asos, Target, and Zara dominate the first page of google search results pushing these great smaller brands to pages very few people will visit. This limits their ability to grow their target market and thus their business. Often meaning these great Australian retailers are limited to their immediate community and word of mouth.

Customers:

Because of the two-sided marketplace implementation, there are two customers. The first is the consumer, these are women who want clothes that fit, but can often struggle to find them quickly online or in-store. Although this is an issue faced by the majority of women, Wardrobe will initially target women 25+. This is because typically large fast-fashion brands like Zara target younger women, who often prioritize cheap prices and don’t mind an uncomfortable fit. Whereas as women get older they typically look for clothes that they can comfortably wear all day and look great in and are often looking for unique brands. The other side of our market is that of the retailers who sell their individual garments. Wardrobe is targeting small to medium-sized retailers who want to get their unique retail items in front of their target market. These small retailers can often struggle to get their great clothes in front of their target market especially when competing on google, where large brands often dominate the first page, making it exceptionally difficult for consumers to find these great brands.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

Currently, I am developing the MVP, however, for Wardrobe to be easily maintainable and infinitely scalable, it would require professional development which I currently do not have the skills to do. Thus, the seed funding would be combined with my own personal funds to enable the development of the second iteration of Wardrobe this would be done once Beta testing, review, and validation of the MVP I am currently creating have been done. This is to ensure that the funding is going to produce a well-considered product that the target consumers can use effectively.

Additional information:

In order to provide market validation and build Wardrobe’s business and technical functionality, the MVP will only sell pants. Limiting the scope of clothes will act as a stepping stone for future developments where the range of clothing available will be increased. Wardrobe strives to provide societal benefit particularly in the following ways:

– Enabling customers to search for Australian Made, Australian Material, and or Eco-conscious clothing brands.

– Measurement and reduction in clothing returns – many returned clothing items get sent to landfills after return and are not sold. This reduction in returns will reduce the carbon emissions from clothing transport.

– By connecting users to Australian retailers would encourage the purchase of clothing with fewer air miles and feel more confident to spend more money on higher quality items rather than fast-fashion clothing waste.

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Business Plan

Hale Anxiety Management App

Keara Levett

” The hale app was tailored specifically for the needs of people suffering from anxiety but will be valuable/beneficial for everyone and anyone looking to feel calmer.”

Description:

The apps program works by actively monitors individuals’ heart rates to better detect sudden spikes in heart rate usually linked to heightened anxiety. Once the system detects it, the app sends calming pulses at the pace the individual should breathe to get back to their resting heart rate. The goal was to completely reorientate how people handle their anxiety as the app provides real-time support on the very physical (and sometimes hardest to control) elements of anxiety, which in turn would lead to long term solutions. The app aims to help people fight their anxiety/panic attacks by sending pulses to remind the user to do controlled breathwork before it gets too out of hand to control. This tracking function is an effective and immediate way to combat anxiety that will help individuals in the moment rather than the traditional methods which usually focus on longtime improvements such as therapy and a healthy lifestyle. By allowing individuals to gather physical data on their own anxiety, It enables them to understand it and better manage their anxiety in future. With Hales analysis function, people can also see what the source of their anxiety is in a graph format to better identify what changes they can make in their day to day to avoid the sensation of anxiety.

Problem:

In this day and age, mental illness is becoming much less taboo, allowing people to feel more comfortable to reach out & receive help. As of 2017, It is globally estimated that 284 million people experience an anxiety disorder worldwide. Although more people are seeking treatment, many reveal to be unsatisfied with the tools given to remain calm & that the tools are hard to apply when in a state of anxiety. As someone who has lived with an anxiety disorder (Generalized anxiety disorder) since early childhood, I found it quite challenging to apply breathing techniques during a moment of panic. Under an insurmountable amount of stress, breathing can be the last thing on your mind, as it feels like your mind is paralysed. Growing up, I never felt in tune with my body & began having panic attacks. When the anxiety crept up, I struggled to comprehend why I was reacting in such an amplified way and how I was supposed to stop the overwhelming emotional/physical response that was thrust upon me. It felt unbearably isolating, especially as a young girl, and I never knew other people struggled in the same ways I did. The stigma surrounding mental health at the time did not make me feel comforted to reach out & I felt forced to suffer in silence until my diagnosis in 2018. My story does not stand alone; only 46% of people with mental illness have accessed a form of treatment which is half that of a person with a physical disorder, states Black Dog Institute. Mental health issues make up a substantial portion of Australia’s top disease burdens. When compared to physical health facilities, mental health and psychiatric care are very much underfunded. The under-resourcing of mental health programs often prevents the least able and most vulnerable people from overcoming adverse health determinants causing the mental illness to be left untreated. Mental health receives less than half the funding of the comparable burden of disease funding, although the need is apparent. The lack of resources and awareness surrounding anxiety makes it much harder for medical professionals to prevent or delay the development of future mental health problems and promote the best conditions for healthy cognitive development. With all of this considered, my app is vital to ensure the health and wellbeing of not only people with anxiety but the entire globe. Hale provides immediate support through guided pulses & breath-work sessions, which generates long-lasting solutions. Hale also gives users access to resources to learn more about anxiety which bridges the gap in the inequalities still seen in the mental health industry today. With the help of Hale, the controlled breathing will become the bodies automatic response to any sensations of anxiety. Everyone has the opportunity to no longer feel weaken by their anxiety and learn how to take charge.

Customers:

The hale app was tailored specifically for the needs of people suffering from anxiety but will be valuable/beneficial for everyone and anyone looking to feel calmer.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

If I were to win the seed capital funding, it would all go directly into the development of the app. I have already created a Hale prototype that functions however I need help from developers to fine-tune everything to improve the engagement.

Additional information:

I have done all the necessary steps to create the app such as research, refining my ideas and actually creating a prototype. All I need is the funding to make the app a reality 🙂

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Mindful Terra

Bronte Hambridge

“Funding would give us the ability to set up a sustainable supply chain and support wholesalers that align with our earth-friendly value. We would also focus the funds towards more customisation options, maximising the health benefits for the consumer and allow us to co-design the product with a nutritionist.”

Description:

We are Mindful Terra and we are launching Australia’s first customisable plant-based protein powder. This idea stemmed from our own desire for a product that would allow us to conveniently combine protein powder with supplements to achieve increased autonomy over our nutrition and health. We operate based on three main pillars; to be body friendly, earth friendly and cruelty free. We are more than just a protein powder brand as we are committed to operate within a circular economy model and have a focus on accessibility, inclusion and social impact. Unlike other brands we have a differentiated approach to taking our product to market through visibility, awareness and reacting to the system.

Problem:

In 2021, our supermarkets are stocked with highly processed foods, we are all becoming more sedentary, often seeking convenience, and our soil is creating less nutrient dense produce. Individuals struggle to achieve all of their nutritional needs through food, causing complicated supplementation schedules and filling our cabinets with pill bottles which can be costly to the planet and our wallets. We created Mindful Terra in response to this challenge.

Customers:

Our target market is a young adult (20-35yrs) demographic, who has a growing awareness of social challenges and, whilst they may not be perfect, try to be ethical consumers. This target demographic leads a busy lifestyle and will appreciate the simplification of nutrition in their supplement schedule.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

Funding would give us the ability to set up a sustainable supply chain and support wholesalers that align with our earth-friendly value. We would also focus the funds towards more customisation options, maximising the health benefits for the consumer and allow us to co-design the product with a nutritionist. This funding would also give us the opportunity to expand our team and hire an IT specialist to develop a quiz that recommends a product to a consumer, increasing our brand’s convenience and accessibility.

Additional information:

We are a team of soon-to-be graduates from a Bachelor of Creative Intelligence and Innovation at University of Technology Sydney. From this degree we have the skillset to unpack and solve complex problems, apply different hats when working in a transdisciplinary team and the ability to adapt to different contexts. So far we have begun preliminary prototyping for our base formula whilst simultaneously developing our marketing/PR strategy, and successfully connecting with industry stakeholders. We have developed our brand aesthetic through the launch of our website and social media profiles.

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WeShare!

Phan Thuy Duyen Nguyen

“If we won the seed capital we would invest in to develop a MVP version of app with the core functionality of enabling people to share their food.”

Description:

Our concern towards reducing world hunger, sustainability, and the personal experience with lack of resources during the last two years acted as a driving notion towards the development of the platform, WeShare! The application will let us share the perfectly consumable surplus food among the neighbours and help reduce community hunger. It will allow you to share lovely homemade recipes, healthy home-grown vegetables, tasty oven baked cookies or your surplus helpful groceries to needy. The geo location notification feature will allow people to easily access food in their locality. We aim to bring hotels, restaurants, and event venues on board to share their surplus food on WeShare! to enable the continuous supply of food. In long run WeShare! will also enable businesses or individuals to share or sell the food approaching best before date products on the application at lower prices. It will also allow our food poverty warriors to share their impact and measures to reduce food wastage in our community tab. We are aiming to bring communities together to fight world hunger and use precious resources to their full potential. We believe that we share because we care and aim to make our community a better place.

Problem:

Food is one of the precious resources on earth. In Australia around 7.3 million tonnes of food is wasted every year, while about 2.5 million tonnes of it is absolutely edible. An average household wastes around 4.9 kilograms of food every week purposefully due to improper planning. On the other hand, 5 million Australians are going hungry. This food poverty is resulting in malnutrition and negative impacts on mental wellbeing. The number of people unable to afford healthy diet is rising at a sharp rate due to covid-19 while the food wasted every day is reaching unprecedented values at a similar or higher rates. The food wasted has huge environmental impact as the food wasted is more than the food thrown away, it includes entire supply chains where huge amount of energy is consumed while preparing. The statistics of food wastage to the people going hungry indicate that there is enough food to feed everyone if properly planned.

Customers:

Our current target market is college students and young adults within the age group of 16- 45 years.
How they would spend seed capital funding: If we won the seed capital we would invest in to develop a MVP version of app with the core functionality of enabling people to share their food.

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Public Disclosure Statement

Jack the Silly-Yak

Alexandra Mangano

“Since being diagnosed with 3 auto immune diseases at 13, Alexandra turned to song-writing as a healthy creative outlet, for years she performed her original songs as a soloist around Newcastle including being a regular at Lizottes.”

Description: 

Hello! I am Alexandra Mangano, an artist from Newcastle NSW and I actively work in the arts sector creating community based interactive theatre using original music, story and experiences. I am the creator of Jack the Silly-Yak a children’s brand designed to inspire and uplift young people to continue to commit to be their true selves even through dramatic change. My idea is to grow the brand ‘Jack the Silly-Yak’ into a community of connection and support to continue to inspire young people of all different abilities, backgrounds and health experiences to find ways to be their authentic selves. As a young person there are many ways to feel disconnected from the world and think you are too small to have your voice heard. As a child with chronic disease I was fortunate enough to have support and encouragement from my community to strive, to dream, to believe and be in control. Jack proves that little voices can be big voices and with a little creativity and support from the ‘Big Yaks’ (aka adults) in the world they can achieve anything. Jack’s Coeliac story is the first of many planned to highlight various invisible diseases effecting young people in Australia. Through growing this brand more books will follow focusing on Jack’s friends with different diseases, tour interactive events to connect directly with local affiliated businesses, communities and families. I also plan to create an online TV show and activities, to bring Silly-Yak fun and education into Aussie homes and finally, plan to develop products and tools to further enrich young people’s lives. Each Jack the Silly-Yak product and experience will be full of educational fun, drawing on various levels of play to help enable children of all backgrounds and abilities to participate and feel welcomed. Stay Safe and Stay Silly Everyone!!!

Problem:

1. Lots of information talking at kids There is a lot of information about kid related health issues that is targeted at adults, my brand is focused on communicating with kids and delivering information from their point of view, packaged to engage, fascinate and truly inform them.

2. The wider issues of a family’s dealing with kids with illness and disability. When many things suddenly change, as is the case when a child is unwell, this can negatively impact everyone involved. Silly-Yak reminds that when delivered with fun, it can ease the tension making information more easily absorbed and more readily adopted. 3. Kids not being able to be kids. When working at my local children’s hospital I see how many young people struggle living and thriving with chronic illness, Silly-Yak and my planned extension projects are designed to encourage the courage to cope and still be themselves, dream, plan and achieve. 4. Limited paid work for young creatives in regional areas. Silly-Yak has already brought exposure and experience to local creative youth/emerging artists and the plan is to continue to engage these creators and help turn their passions into income earning professions which in turn add to a sustainable entertainment industry in regional areas. 5. General awareness and consideration for families with a child with health issues. Unless you are close to a child with chronic disease it is difficult to understand the impacts it has, not only on the child but the whole family. It can really disrupt the foundations and the confidence to grow, reach out and connect. Silly-Yak is designed to raise awareness of chronic invisible illness and to make these conversations common place in Aussie homes.

Customers: 

Customer – Adults wanting to inspire and inform about childhood illness, (Parents/ carers/ organisations, schools) Consumer – Kids 0-8 with invisible chronic disease and kids who want to empathise with kids with health issues.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

1. In addition to the expert advice, align with a PR professional to effectively promote this band and work towards greater exposure and a return on current investment along with additional profit and growth, turning this business into a well known brand.

2.Recording original music, written and performed by me in support of the brand

3.Produce an online TV Show employing regional talent.

4.Interactive Tour, connecting with families and supporting local affiliated business.

5.Create merchandise to further support kids with coeliac disease, beyond the current coeliac diners card.
a. Jack the Silly-Yak Puppet, to provide comfort and support when kids are dining out or in hospital.
b. Jack Snack Box, providing a purpose build pack, reminding families to never leave home without some safe gluten free snacks in case it is difficult to find them on the run.
c. ‘Silly-Yak Friendly’ Re-useable Stickers – Helping young Coeliacs and families identify what is silly-yak friendly in their fridge and cupboard!

Additional information:

Since being diagnosed with 3 auto immune diseases at 13, Alexandra turned to song-writing as a healthy creative outlet, for years she performed her original songs as a soloist around Newcastle including being a regular at Lizottes. In recent years she has used her music as a form of expression in her interactive theatre productions with companies like Tantrum Youth Arts and Branch Nebula. As an emerging and youth artist Alexandra collaborated with other performers, writers and musicians to devise 7+ original interactive and community based shows, one of which was toured to Sydney with PACT theatre in 2017. Alexandra received residency with Tantrum Youth Arts in 2019 where she lead a group of women all living with various invisible diseases through creative process of an interactive show, called Precondition. The goal of this work was to introduce audiences to what it was like to live the life of someone with Chronic Illness. Precondition was a 13+ event highlighting the highs and lows of chronic illness through video, music, performance, and interactive theatre. She is passionate about continuing to create work for teens and adults highlighting living with chronic illness to further inspire and connect people in this and the wider community. In 2018, Alexandra completed a Bachelor of Communication, Majoring in Media Production at UoN, allowing her to increase her skills and knowledge in communication and creative film production. At university Alexandra completed additional courses in physical drama performance, screen art, immersive theatre for young people and children’s book design. Following her final year she was awarded the Jessie Reid Dyce Memorial Prize in Drama for recognition of her performance and dedication to theatre throughout the 2018 academic year at The University of Newcastle. Alexandra also works with young people as a drama tutor with Tantrum Youth Arts (2019-current) and Hunter Drama (2017-2020). And since 2019, working with Starlight Children’s Foundation at the John Hunter Children’s Hospital.

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Pitch Attachment

Zeco

Janhvi Sirohi

” Everyone close your eyes, just for a moment and look into your closet. How many t-shirts do you have? How many jeans? How many shoes? Now open your eyes and think.”

Description:

We merge our passion for fashion and a desire for a sustainable future through our brand, Zeco. Zeco is a sustainable fashion brand and platform with a focus on Zero-waste pattern making because sustainability starts with the designer. Zero waste pattern cutting is the smart utilisation of all the space on a fabric to eliminate fabric waste. We will use sustainable fabrics like deadstock and eco fabrics. Our focus is on quality (long-term) pieces that you can wear for years to come or pass it down to later generations. We also realise that convenience is key, which is why we make it easier for consumers to discover other sustainable brands on the same platform. Our platform will not only showcase our designs but also other sustainable brands vetted by us. Creating job opportunities for young female creators is at the heart of our business. Furthermore, we will allow consumers to return to our platform and resell clothes they bought from us in exchange for credits that they can use to buy other fashion pieces from the marketplace. We will provide full transparency of our supply chain and manufacturing process.

Problem: 

Everyone close your eyes, just for a moment and look into your closet. How many t-shirts do you have? How many jeans? How many shoes? Now open your eyes and think. When I counted mine, I had 116 t-shirts (all different shapes and colors), 40 jeans and 12 shoes and yet nothing to wear. Can you relate to that? This is when I realised that the number of items in my closet no longer had any value. The fashion industry works in the take-make-waste model. We take from our environment, make with no regard to the consumer and throw it away after 1 or 2 wears. Fast fashion is a highly exploitative business model that replicates trends to meet demand, resulting in inexpensive mass production of clothing & accessories. But this comes at a cost which is being paid by the environment. It takes 3000 litres of water for 1 cotton shirt. We multiply that by the 116 t-shirts in my closet and that is 313,200 litres of water. That means if I drink 2 litres of water a day, I have 429 years of drinking water in my closet. 20-30% of fabric ends up in the landfill during the manufacturing process. In the US alone, there is 25 Billion pounds of textile waste. 15% gets recycled, 85% ends up in the land fill.

Customers:

18-40 year olds, sustainably-conscious females. A majority of our target audience will be based in Australia and the US.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

Raw Materials (fabrics, packaging material) – 40% Website – 20% Marketing – 20% Miscellaneous (registration, insurance, storage, memberships) – 15% Supplies (office supplies, cameras) – 5%

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Business Plan

Escollate

Elaine Kwong

“I am a clinical hospital pharmacist who has worked in Digital Health. In my 6 years of experience in healthcare at over 5 Australian hospitals, our healthcare system consistently lacks feedback from their staff. My deep connections within the healthcare industry with executive staff, healthcare policymakers and frontline workers allow me to understand the gaps in communication…”

Description:

Aussie’s first health tech to engage staff, understand their problems and collate ideas together We believe everyone has the power to innovate. The best ideas and solutions often come from those who are closest to the problem. We empower healthcare organisations to connect with their most invaluable asset – an engaged workforce. We are building a safe healthcare community that empowers people to freely share ideas and overcome bureaucracy. I believe in the power and wisdom of the community and that people should play active roles in shaping their own work environment. Staff submit and upvote problems and ideas on a communal platform to inspire management and prioritise issues to direct resources effectively. Staff passionate about an idea, solution or subject of interest can form working groups and escalate proposals directly to relevant decision-makers. I believe that the culture of feedback in healthcare needs to change, allowing staff to feel protected when speaking up and escalating problems. Therefore there is an option for users to submit problems and ideas anonymously. In full transparency, the platform allows staff to see a roadmap of each approved solution and reasons why some proposals were unsuccessful. Escollate enables more instantaneous feedback and greater adaptability in uncertain times. It allows health organisations to find solutions to problems with greater reach and deeper understanding. Analytics tools can generate data pre- and post-implementation to assess the impact for each solution Together, we can create an inclusive workplace culture where everyone can contribute.

Problem:

During this pandemic, Australian hospitals must frequently and rapidly implement system-wide changes, especially during this pandemic. Hospitals are vulnerable to poorly-informed decisions and missed opportunities. Delayed feedback and poor communication between clinical staff and policymakers lead to higher patient morbidity and mortality, hospital costs and declining staff retention. Most recently working amidst the pandemic, I noticed many problems were anticipated by staff but were not promptly escalated. An example is the COVID outbreaks within healthcare settings (e.g. between hospital wards and within ED) which contributed to Melbourne’s most recent lockdown. Deficits in contact precautions workflows were clearly identified by many healthcare workers and were warning signs. However, frontline staff felt incapable of solving the problem as individuals and were daunted by speaking up publicly to challenge the status quo. Many ideas and frustrations from my peers remained unheard due to fear of scrutinisation. Countless precedents have reinforced this culture. For example, Dr Yumiko Kadota, a previous surgeon-in-training, spoke up about the culture of the system at the cost of her dream job for which she had already invested many years. These frustrations manifested at its end-stage by the mass exodus of employees since the start of this year. This induced a vicious cycle of costly workforce inefficiencies. New staff needed to be recruited, inducted and trained whilst remaining staff carried an even heavier workload and stress. Statistics show that there is a rising staff turnover rate each year, exponentially increased during this pandemic, as high as 30% for nurses alone. According to global and local institutions like Seek, IBIS World and Australian Industry and Skills Committee, healthcare is one of Australia’s biggest employers. Published research shows that poor communication and feeling unheard are common reasons for the costly departure of frontline staff. This is particularly damaging to our currently overloaded health system. It is time for our healthcare to live out their people and culture-first values.

Customers: 

Any health organisations with more than 50 staff members.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

If we receive $7,500, we will invest our funding in: – $3000 on developing a robust backend cyber security system. Security is our top priority to protect our customers’ data. – $2500 on developing maintenance and support systems for our customers. – $2000 on other business costs, such as web hosting costs If we receive $30,000, we will invest the additional funding in: – 20% Targeted customer acquisition – 30% Further establish structured co-design and beta testing partnerships with other healthcare organisations – 20% Developing educational and training material to equip users better use the system (e.g. how to write budget proposals) – 30% other potential costs

Additional information:

MVP launched with testing partner Alfred Health (300 people department) in July 2021. Developing our beta prototype at the moment. I am a clinical hospital pharmacist who has worked in Digital Health. In my 6 years of experience in healthcare at over 5 Australian hospitals, our healthcare system consistently lacks feedback from their staff. There is an unprecedented volume of staff turnover in this time of instability. My deep connections within the healthcare industry with executive staff, healthcare policymakers and frontline workers allow me to understand the gaps in communication within large organisations firsthand.

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El Adrift

Ellana Pierce

“My dream is not only to create a sustainable swimwear brand but also to inspire young women to have a passion for ocean conservation and sustainable fashion. In the future I plan to dedicate a percentage of profits towards organisations that have aims aligning with these goals.”

Description:

El Adrift swimwear is made from Econyl, a nylon made from fishing nets that are removed from the ocean. Each of these nets may have otherwise remained in the sea trapping and killing marine animals for up to 500 years before decomposing. Econyl also reduces the global warming impact of nylon by up to 90% compared with the material from oil. The swimwear is made by Bali Swim, a manufacturer in Bali dedicated to sustainability and ethical business practices. All of their staff are paid three times above award wages, provided with health insurance for themselves and their families and working hours are less than 40 hours per week. They donate proceeds for every bikini produced to organisations that support the environment, women’s access to education and those in need. Orders will be delivered using compostable bags for packaging to eliminate single use plastics and to ensure every part of the product is sustainable.

Problem: 

Fast fashion relies on cheap manufacturing, frequent consumption and short lived garment use. This has profound implications on the ocean due to excessive usage of water, chemical pollution, textile waste and high CO2 emissions. The United Nations estimates the fashion industry is responsible for 20% of global wastewater, 10% of carbon emissions, and 1.4 million trillion plastic fibers in the ocean. It became clear to me that we must make a change in the clothes we wear and the brands we support if we are to have any chance of minimising and mitigating the impacts of the fashion industry on the ocean. As a beach lover, I was sad to find a lack of sustainable swimwear that was affordable and unique. That’s where the idea for El Adrift was born.

Customers: 

El Adrift is marketed towards young women aged 16-35. The target market will continue to grow with future launches featuring matching mum and bub sets and men’s swimwear.

How they would spend seed capital funding: 

The funding would be used to launch the first collection of El Adrift bikinis, called the Daydreamers collection, just in time for summer this year. The collection features a stunning one piece, and 3 bikini sets all in gorgeous vibrant pastel colours that are on trend and flattering. These pieces have already been designed and the samples have been used to promote El Adrift on Instagram and Facebook. The Daydreamers collection is available for preorder now on Eladrift.com.au. A portion of the funding would also be used to purchase a direct thermal label printer with Australian made compostable labels for packaging.

Additional information: 

It’s early days for El Adrift right now, but there is already plenty in store for the future. With a growing Facebook and Instagram community I am learning more about what young women want to see in future launches. My dream is not only to create a sustainable swimwear brand but also to inspire young women to have a passion for ocean conservation and sustainable fashion. In the future I plan to dedicate a percentage of profits towards organisations that have aims aligning with these goals. There is already a growing group of El Adrift ambassadors, young women who spread the word of sustainable fashion on social media and show that you don’t have to compromise stunning bikinis for a sustainable brand and affordable price.

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The Future We Weave and Wear

Gabrielle Gillamac

“My desire to create this brand is rooted in seeing a lack of Filipino representation in the Darwin fashion market during my investigations on cultural identity in my fashion studies at high school. As a third-culture kid growing up in Darwin I constantly missed where I originally came from, with this brand, not only do I aspire to protect the environment and to help the Filipino community to the best of my abilities but I also desire to bring and share a piece of my home to Darwin in a way that everyone can enjoy. “

Description:

Culture is an important aspect of individual identity as it sets the tone for people’s sense of outward direction: Filipino fashion is hard to come by in the Northern Territory and inconvenient lengths are taken to acquire it. For example, you can find them through online distributors and wait only to find out that the quality isn’t great or you have to ask for a Filipino relative or friends to get them. This is a shame because Darwin’s Filipino population is substantial and Darwin’s overall population as well as the rest of Australia could benefit from a taste of Filipino fashion. In addition, sustainability is a key issue within the fashion industry. It is the second industry to contribute to Earth’s global pollution levels and due to the demands of fast fashion often exploit workers who make the garment. With these two problems The Future We Weave and Wear Co. aims to produce Terno-inspired (traditional Filipino garments) clothing fit for the Northern Territory climate and lifestyle (tropical living) using a closed-loop business model. Its vision is to increase the presence of Filipino culture in Darwin’s fashion market and to expand nationally.

Problem: 

The Future We Weave and Wear Co.’s has designed three garments inspired by the Filipino-Terno and are in the sample production stage. Part of that stage is to source eco-materials from social-enterprises who weave piña fabrics in the Philippines, while the rest of the materials such as fabric lining and thread will be sourced locally. This enables marginalised communities within the Philippines to preserve their craft economically. The third stage is to organise a pop-up store in Darwin for local customers and a website for national customers, which integrates Filipino culture in Darwin’s fashion market. After post-purchase customers can have the option of returning the product for mending purposes, or to swap it for a store voucher. This extends the product’s life and allows it to be re-innovated into another product. This reduces waste and ensures that garments don’t just end up landfills.

Customers: 

The Future We Weave and Wear Co.’s products are fit for female-identifying, Gen-Z’ers. This segment are truth-seekers who are constantly questioning and exploring their identities. They value being open to appreciating and experiencing different cultures and fashions and are social media savvy. Another target segment are millennials who are nostalgic for their Filipino heritage or are seeking to connect with the Filipino culture.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

My MVP are cropped versions of garments (shown on my YouTube video) in order to make it affordable for my customers. I would use the Seed Capital Funding to purchase the materials needed for the garments including: the weaved pina fabric that needs to be imported from AntHill Gallery Fabrics in the Philippines, embellishments, lining fabric, zippers, labels and boning to name a few, as well as sewing equipment such as a serger machine that finishes garment hems neatly. To make 10 of each garment design would cost approximately $500 for materials excluding labour. I would also use it to launch a pop-up store in Darwin and to build a website that’s accessible nationally. Finally I would use it to fund the necessary business fees and fund promotional activities such as social media advertising on Instagram as that is where my target customers are found.

Additional information: 

My desire to create this brand is rooted in seeing a lack of Filipino representation in the Darwin fashion market during my investigations on cultural identity in my fashion studies at high school. As a third-culture kid growing up in Darwin I constantly missed where I originally came from, with this brand, not only do I aspire to protect the environment and to help the Filipino community to the best of my abilities but I also desire to bring and share a piece of my home to Darwin in a way that everyone can enjoy. The key challenges are managing the stock. The pina-fabric although eco-friendly are produced in small quantities of a particular colour and style by the manufacturer. Producing the same product as advertised will be a challenge and customer expectations will need to be managed from the beginning. Another challenge is the production capacity, as I am a sole trader I will likely need to employ another seamstress to sew the garments later down the line. Due to this I’ve planned a cap off for how many orders I can take and will inform customers from the beginning.

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Divergent Connections (DC)

Fel Andronicou

“As a young autistic person I was disappointed to discover there are no support groups locally where I could meet other neurodiverse peers and practice socializing in a safe and supported space. To be able to access a pre-existing group I had to travel across Melbourne on public transport or ask one of my extremely busy parents (who work full time jobs each) to drive me which both were unfeasible and inaccessible Divergent Connections will fill this significant gap in our local community by providing peer support that is close to participants and accessible.”

Description:

Divergent Connections is a safe community space to facilitate accessible, inclusive, and diverse peer supported conversations to assist neurodiverse young people who may or may not be suffering from social isolation, loneliness, mental health and more… This is done in a casual environment of either a youth centre or community house with two facilitators who engage participants in various activities of their choosing/interest which will help to develop social skills, friendships and facilitate growth for their individual goals. Participants will be charged through either government funded support (if they have access to it) or at an affordable price that takes into consideration financial difficulties. I have obtained grant funding from my local council to begin with a pilot version of divergent connections with auspicing support from the Disability Resource Centre and mentoring from Aleksei Bondarenko-Edwards. I plan to measure the success of the pilot through either/or both participant and support networks of the individuals feedback surveys as well as number of sign ups and social media presence.

Problem: 

As a young autistic person I was disappointed to discover there are no support groups locally where I could meet other neurodiverse peers and practice socializing in a safe and supported space. To be able to access a pre-existing group I had to travel across Melbourne on public transport or ask one of my extremely busy parents (who work full time jobs each) to drive me which both were unfeasible and inaccessible Divergent Connections will fill this significant gap in our local community by providing peer support that is close to participants and accessible.

Customers: 

Neurodiverse young adults aged 20-35.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

I would spend the seed funding on: (all prices are approximates) Unit description Unit costs Unit # Weekly total unit cost 24-week total costs Room hire 033.1 2 66.2 1,588.8 Facilitator 60 2 120 2,880 Mentor/ Co facilitator 80 2 160 3,840 Insurance 600 1 NA 600 Website and marketing 3300 1 NA 3,300 Workshop costs 30 1 30 720 Policy and procedure and accountant 100 20 NA 2,000 Total cost 14,928

Additional information:

– Peer support has been proven to be successful as it’s used in hospitals, youth centres and disability organisations – I am a volunteer with headspace Bentleigh, and I have been trained in peer support.

– I have access to auspicing from the Disability Resource Centre, grant funding and marketing from my local council and marketing from Amaze.

– I am resilient and I have access to the necessary supports for my health and wellbeing to ensure the success of my endeavours.

– I completed an internship at the Disability Resource centre that taught me the skills of stakeholder consultation, grant writing, strategic planning, youth engagement consulting and survey development and analysis.

– I have a public blog that will be linked to the business and used for marketing: https://www.facebook.com/x.divergent.fel.x

Strategic Plan

Vision

Pay the Difference

Briarley Walden

“Pay the Difference is a profit-for-purpose business that will provide an opportunity for artists to make and sell their art, with the proceeds of those sales going towards our goal, which is to help end poverty in our area (Perth, WA). “

Note: other: I have a disability and require a substitute to speak on my behalf when pitching and to read my acceptance speech.

Description:

Pay the Difference is a profit-for-purpose business that will provide an opportunity for artists to make and sell their art, with the proceeds of those sales going towards our goal, which is to help end poverty in our area (Perth, WA). My idea is that we can pay the difference between what the government and charities contribute to this cause and the amount it will actually take to end poverty here in Perth. I will achieve this by facilitating the making and selling of art pieces for a profit and given that art has infinite potential, we will be able to sustain this idea over time. My plan is to start a studio in which I will make some of our first pieces of art to sell (I have the very first pieces lined up already), then grow the business by hiring out the space and equipment to local artists who can either make their own work there or help contribute to the project. Eventually I would like to commission artists to create original artworks that can be sold for higher prices. I plan to donate our profits to organisations that target poverty in Perth initially, like the Raise the Rate for Good campaign, Shelter WA, Perth Homeless Support Group Inc., Street Friends WA, Fitted for Work and Dress for Work.

Problem: 

I have observed that there is a high level of poverty in my area, and that traditional charity and government funding models have not solved the problem. Ending poverty in Perth would have a huge impact on our population, not only for the 9% of our residents that are currently deprived of the most basic human needs, but for the rest of us too. An influx of tens, potentially even hundreds of thousands into the workforce would improve our economy for everyone and it would take the strain off of the public housing, public health and emergency services systems. This would mean more tax dollars could go towards improving life for all citizens, and not towards a system that isn’t meeting the needs of those it should benefit. We will evaluate our success by how much money we can generate for our chosen organisations who are already doing the fantastic work needed to end poverty in Perth, the more we make for them, the more successful our business is. Change won’t happen overnight, but we can take real steps towards improving the lives of over 230 000 people, one person at a time.

Customers: 

We have three main groups that we will be helping with this business, people experiencing poverty, artists who want a creative space and to sell their artwork, and people who want to buy good quality art and make a difference to their local community.

How they would spend seed capital funding:

To start off with, I would explore options like displaying our art on consignment in places like cafes, other businesses and local government buildings to generate initial sales. Then I would move on to marketing my business and creating a website to get the word out about what we are doing. I would also pay to spend some time with an accountant, and I have a connection with an arts lawyer/profit-for-purpose expert to walk me through the logistics of running this business. Lastly, I would rent an industrial space ($23850 for a year including estimated outgoings) to use as a studio and equip it accordingly. I would also invest in a coffee cart and barista so workers in the surrounding areas and passers-by will be drawn into our establishment.

Additional information: 

I’m extremely motivated to achieve the goal of ending poverty in my local area in a timely fashion because, due to health reasons, I am unlikely to live past my late 60s, so I want to help as much as I can while I can. Coming from a position of relative privilege means I can use that relative financial stability to empower others and end preventable suffering. I am also extremely motivated to leave our planet in a better state for future generations, which is why we will be using biodegradable packaging for our items and practicing energy conservation in our workshop. In addition to following those procedures, we will be adopting an environmentally responsible attitude. Some forms of art can only be done with new materials e.g. paint, it usually needs to be unused before it goes on a canvas, but wherever we can we will be sure to reduce, reuse and recycle. Another thing that should be taken into account is that I am pursuing qualifications in visual art at TAFE, I have included an image of some of my artwork and the logo for this business that I designed.

Artwork 1

Artwork 2

Artwork 3

Artwork 4

Vision

Staples of Change

Ellie Hewitt

“Staples of Change is a social enterprise that creates
sustainable school resources with each purchase
earning Impact Dollars that empower students to
connect with and support global education projects.”

Description: 

By providing schools with an ethical choice of school resources that have a real impact, we change the lives of students in Australia and throughout the globe. We create a more compassionate, just, and equal world. We do this through: – Sustainable School Resources: School resources are created sustainably and ethically to protect the planet. – The ‘Choose Your Own Impact’ Model: Schools are reimbursed part of what they paid in Impact Dollars to support global education projects. How it works: 1. Schools purchase Staples of Change products and are reimbursed 25% of the total cost in School Impact Dollars. 2. The school decides how to distribute the Impact Dollars amongst the students. 3. The kids/family/class/school goes onto the Staples of Change website and selects what project they want to support with their School Impact Dollars. 4. The Schools Impact Dollars contribute to bringing that project to life. – Empowers Young Change Makers: Schools that purchase Staples of Change Products are given an Impact Kit to help embed social justice into the school and to empower their students.

Problem: 

First and foremost we want to solve the lack of access to global quality education. 258 million school-aged children and youth are not enrolled in formal education. 

Education is a staple: 

– Education funds futures: providing a young person with one extra year of education beyond the average, will boost their future wages by 20% over their lifetime. 

– It breaks the poverty cycle: If all women had primary education, there would be 1.7 million fewer malnourished children and 50% decrease in child mortality. 

– Grows Economies: Over 40 years, equitable access to quality education can help a country raise its gross domestic product per capita by 23 percent. 

– Fights Climate Change: For every additional year of schooling a girl receives, her country’s resilience to climate disasters can be expected to improve by an average of 3.2 points. Furthermore, Staples of Change seeks to contribute to solving the environmental degredation crisis by providing resources that do not cause harm to the planet. Lastly, Staples of Change will connect young people to global causes and shape them to be young change makers to reduce global inequality and create a better and more equal world.

Customers: 

Schools will be our primary target audience as we want to be able to influence young minds. We also see the benefit in having such a captive audience that is has a strong community. Lastly, we know the power that kids have to change the minds of their peers, families, and beyond, we want to harness this. There are 9 542 registered schools in Australia with 4,006,974 enrolled students. Averaging 5 books per student, our total product market size for our launch product alone could be 20 million!! 

Our Pitch to schools to buy Staples of Change products: 

– Make your school stand out: Australian studies show that a key consideration for parents when comparing schools is value alignment. Focussing not only on academic results but rather schools that support the development of a Well-Rounded Person. 

– Made in Australia: We offer high-quality products that are made with young people in mind by local manufacturers in Australia. 

– Sustainable: Our Products are made sustainably so you are helping the planet. 

– Benefits students: Staples supports your students development and growth as young global citizens, empowering them to be changemakers. 

– Impact: And of course, purchasing Staples products supports education projects around the globe.

How they would spend seed capital funding: 

To fund the Launch Product: To launch the Staples of Change collection we will release a range of workbooks. The collection will include appropriately lined writing books for Prep – Yr 6, as well as lined graph books. These products will be made from 100% post-consumer recycled paper and card, will be Forest Stewardship Council approved, printed using vegetable-based inks, and with green electricity. Each of the front covers is designed to assist students in reflecting on important themes such as equality, mental health, Indigenous Rights, peace, community, diversity, and so on. And the best part, they are meant to be coloured in!

Business Plan

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solarmuster

Amber Truong

” Many people think that renewable energy equals no waste when in reality all energy-producing technologies produce waste that should be managed responsibly. We’re at the most critical point in human history – there is a technological disruption in the energy sector. As coal and fossil fuel retired, renewable uptake will continue to increase.”

Description:

At solarmuster, we unite change-making sustainability-focused businesses and responsible consumers to create a better world. We do this by building a marketplace where consumers can source and adopt environmentally conscious brands in PV sector for the full life cycle of solar panels. This includes: 

– Solar manufacturers/retailers that sell recyclable PV systems 

– A second-hand market for people who want to buy, give away or sell their old but functional panels. (*Solar panels have 25-30 years in lifespan however sometimes people upgrade their systems to achieve a higher efficiency with the Government rebate program). 

– Recycling, repair and quality assurance services 

With this market place, we create the following impacts:
– Reduce cost for solar consumers by connecting them directly with sustainable solar manufacturers (instead of going through a retailer or a quote service)

– Incentivise the design for repair, refurbishment and disassembly from manufacturers through our eco-labelling system

– Create a visibility for and enable recycling services through our collection points map and economic of scale process 

Altogether, we aim to enable the transition to a renewable and clean energy future by creating greater commitment and collaboration from all stakeholders in PV market to build a circular economy. This is a multibillion dollars market. However, so far, solarmuster is the only one that provides full life cycle services for PV sector and creates value for everyone in the market itself.

Problem:

Many people think that renewable energy equals no waste when in reality all energy-producing technologies produce waste that should be managed responsibly. We’re at the most critical point in human history – there is a technological disruption in the energy sector. As coal and fossil fuel retired, renewable uptake will continue to increase. In Australia, up to 17,000 tonnes of PV waste has been produced by 2020 and around 1 million tonnes will be there by 2050. What’s bad? These solar panels have toxic chemicals such as lead and cadmium. When disposed in landfills, these chemicals can leak into soil and pollute the environment. What’s even worse? To date, Australia has no concrete plan in place to encourage manufacturer responsibility and enforce recyclability. The problem is not solar panel waste, but our attitude and inaction towards it. Everyone knows it is coming, but no one has prepared a solution for it. 1. Government policies incentivise the production and installation of solar panels but not their removal and disposal. 2. There is a lack of transparent, cost-effective and efficient technologies and processes to repair, reuse and recycle solar panels. 3. There is a challenge to incentivise a circular economy and encourage people to take actions.

Customers:
We’re a two-sided market, our customers include any stakeholders in the PV market, including:

– Residents

– Sustainable councils

– Commercial businesses and tenants.

– Solar equipment distributors

– Others

How they would spend seed capital funding: 

The Seed Capital Funding will be prioritised to:

– Build the MVP

– Run testing and pilot program The built MVP and the collected feedback/validation results through the pilot program will be used to further seek fundings from other sources to enable the company further.

Additional information:

Reducing our negative impacts is not enough, the goal now is to have as many positive impacts as possible. Support solarmuster by either introducing us to potential partners/customers, funding our initiatives or simply joining our team today!!!

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Cà phê espresso

Katrina Trinh

” The idea solves the lengthy time taken in the process of how Vietnamese coffee is traditionally made and removes a lot of the steps.”

Description:

Find and immerse yourself in Vietnam’s love affair with coffee all in one pod. There are two things that go naturally hand in hand with each other: Coffee pods and an espresso machine – We’re here to give you Vietnam’s famous condensed milk-based iced coffee in one shot. The Vietnamese have a strong coffee culture that is a part of their daily lives and brings people together to socialise. What sets Vietnamese coffee apart from other coffee is its butter and brandy roast which gives it a richness in the back palate and a strong seductive aroma. Why not make the resulting rich bitter and slightly nutty coffee more seamlessly? Vietnam’s famous condensed milk-based iced coffee, in pod form, can finally be accessible to the aisles of domestic retail stores and offer the diversity in the coffee market. There are times when tradition is worth going against, like using a coffee pod and machine over a phin, and the results will feel worth it – it only takes a few minutes. We, as Australian consumers with diverse backgrounds, exist beyond it in a place made up of our own recollection, senses and imagination – and yes that even means in our own coffee. Coffee is essential in our everyday lives and can be ordinarily found in the aisles of all the largest chain retailers such as Woolworths and Coles. Coffee products of all kinds have gained a fervent fan base. Ca phe espresso’s key message is our connection to Vietnamese culture and it is what will attract our customers. The pods denote something heartfelt and meaningful in its pureness of purpose: to be consumed proudly and transport you into a sensorial escape.

Problem: 

The idea solves the lengthy time taken in the process of how Vietnamese coffee is traditionally made and removes a lot of the steps. Vietnamese coffee grounds can be found pretty readily at Asian grocers here in Australia. Coffee is commonly brewed in individual portions using a French-style metal drip filter, known as phin, which sits on top of the cup. Coarsely ground arabica beans are tightly pressed inside the phin and preheated boiling hot water is poured and slowly filtered through. In terms of the proposed new coffee-making process, it reduces time in two ways. First, there is no need to use the French-styled metal filter called the phin. One less step, one less mess. There would be no need to use the metal filter, and no need to wash it afterwards. The grounded coffee will be developed and tested to achieve maximum richness and nuttiness. Second, all the ingredients are packaged into one pod which includes ground roasted arabica coffee and condensed milk. It removes the step of needing to add tablespoons full of condense milk from the tin can. Lactose-free condensed milk can also be offered for those who often struggle with lactose intolerance – a very common dietary issue amongst Australians that must be catered for. By also incorporating by sustainable materials such as creating sustainable pods, it promotes sustainability in practice and common household knowledge in Australia. Traditionally, Vietnamese coffee is sold widely across Australia and all other countries in plastic materials. This will help reduce plastic usage in everyday households.

Customers:
18+, adults of all ages, working professionals and coffee lovers

How they would spend seed capital funding:

– Sourcing of ground coffee through manufacturers
– Prototyping on sustainable coffee pods and packaging
– Recipe testing
– Batch production costs
– E-commerce: Online retail store development and go-to-market strategies before launch
– Marketing resourcing

Poster 1

Poster 2

Product Range

Business Pitch

Resource Allocation

Budget